Humanitarian Photographraphy

“IRREPLACEABLE!”

Wrap your head around this because at this rate … they WILL be gone forever! “North of Zimbabwe, in central Africa, an estimated 23,000 elephants, or roughly 60 each day, were killed last year. A pound of elephant tusk sells for about $1,500 on the black market. That’s more than double the price just five years ago. Ivory is used to make carved ornaments and trinkets.”

read more: http://www.chron.com/news/science/article/APNewsBreak-Africa-land-grabs-endanger-elephants-5415921.php

2014 Performing Images Photography by Pat Corlin

All Rights Reserved

www.PatCorlinPhotography.com

IRREPLACEABLE!

IRREPLACEABLE!

When There Are No Words Simply Read The Wall . . .

When There Are No Words Simply Read The Wall . . .

2014 Performing Images Photography by Pat Corlin
All Rights Reserved
http://www.PatCorlinPhotography.com

#iPhoneography #Why #TheWall #Germany #Berlin

Journey To Tanzania Update!

Join with over 26 heroes who have helped support our initiative to share photos and stories of Tanzania with adults and children as we raise school supplies for the communities we visited. Please consider making a pledge today we have only two days left!  It’s easy and every little bit helps help! Just follow this link to our kickstarter campaign.

If you couldn’t join us for the Journey To Tanzania Exhibit Artists Reception you will want to check out this great project update! A video short created by photographer M.C. Brogan!

Pitcha Pitcha!

Pitcha Pitcha!

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1731146590/journey-to-tanzania/posts

Much thanks to Gary Lamott Photography for donating his serves by providing video clips and still images of the Journey To Tanzania Exhibit Artist’s Reception.

http://www.garylamott.smugmug.com

After The Storm – Repost of Photojournalist Orlando Uy – Talcoban, Philippines

After The Storm

After The Storm

Every now and then I am introduced to the work of an individual that moves me beyond words. Such is the work of photojournalism of Orland Uy of the Philippines.  Extraordinary doesn’t even come close to describing … so I will leave you with two links instead:https://www.facebook.com/walkswithmycamera

http://afternoonwalks.wordpress.com/2013/12/02/after-the-storm/

A walk with my camera

I wasn’t prepared for this, and neither was my government.  After 3 very challenging weeks, I have already come to terms with the situation, that recovery will be a long process but we’ll eventually get there.  The Philippine government, however, is still in denial.  We survived, but eventually it will be politics that will kill us all.

I went out to take photos on the following morning, but after seeing so much pain and struggle, I couldn’t play the role of a casual observer.  I, too, was part of this and I realized that I had a bigger role to play: to survive the aftermath, both physically and emotionally.

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The water supply was shut down except for this pipe at the Tacloban Shopping Center.  There was already a long line of people waiting in line.  They brought every bottle and bucket they had to fill with water.  I made a…

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